Tag

disabilities

Voting Support in Local Elections

By | NESCA Notes 2021

By: Tabitha Monahan, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist/Counselor

It’s after Labor Day, and the signs for local elections will increase significantly over the next two months. Non-presidential election years see a drastic drop in participation in the voting process. This drop extends even more for years where there are only local elections. However, it is our local elections that have the most significant impact on our day-to-day lives. Whether it is the town selectman, city council, zoning board, or school committee, voting for these candidates can make a big difference in the priorities and projects that become the focus of your community.

So how can we help our young people with disabilities exercise their right to vote? Even individuals with guardianship maintain their right to vote in Massachusetts unless the court documents specifically state otherwise. There are many ways to support individuals, but it starts with helping them register. Massachusetts residents can register to vote online when obtaining or renewing a driver’s license or state ID or at the local registrar of voters’ office. Notices from MassHealth and the DTA also include voter registration forms.

Our young people may need more guidance in understanding the importance of voting in local elections and the purpose of those positions. Below are some great resources to support our young people in voting. This article by Rock the Vote explains more about the importance of voting in local elections. Reach out to your local election official to determine what positions will be on the ballot and if there is a local primary election before the November election. Be prepared to explain the role of the positions to youth who may not have had experience dealing with the department.

While there has been less news this year about Absentee/mail-in ballots, and the COVID-19 vaccine is available to all persons of voting age, Absentee/mail-in ballots have long been an excellent strategy for individuals with disabilities who would have difficulty voting in person. Absentee ballots are a great option for individuals who may have difficulty navigating the multiple steps in person or have a lower processing speed.

All citizens are also allowed to bring a person to help them while they are at the polls. Encourage your young person by educating them that many people require assistance at the polls, and it is completely normal to have the help available if they need it. Each polling location should also have at least one AutoMARK Voter Assist Terminal, which helps individuals with visual impairments vote independently.

No one wants their vote not to be counted due to errors filling out their ballot. People can request a sample ballot in advance from their local registrar of voters (the Secretary of State’s website can give you the address and phone number of your local registrar). Practicing filling out ballots in advance (even ballots from previous elections) can help a new voter become comfortable with the form and is great fine motor skill practice for those who may need it!

While typically not applicable to local elections, it is important to remember that the Massachusetts Secretary of State also creates a voter information booklet for each election regarding the ballot initiatives. These red booklets can be found at many community locations and frequently include the local library, post office, and city/town hall. These booklets offer information on what a yay or nay vote would mean and have information from each initiative’s proponents and opponents. Use that sample ballot as a starting point for the different types of elected positions.

Help your young adult find out what the different boards do and why there is an election for things such as town selectman or zoning board. Help your young adult find the websites for candidates running for office and review the candidates’ stances on issues. Ask what issues they want to learn more about and are important to them.

Most importantly, remind them that their voice counts. As many disability rights activists have said, “nothing about us without us.” Individuals with disabilities are greatly affected by the policy decisions that occur in government at all levels. Individuals with disabilities have frequently experienced disenfranchisement, and many groups are working tirelessly to lessen and remove these barriers. How have you helped your young adult exercise their right to vote?

 

About the Author

Tabitha Monahan, M.A., CRC, is an experienced transition evaluator and vocational counselor. While she is well-versed in supporting a wide range of transition-aged youth, she is especially passionate and knowledgeable in helping clients and their families navigate the complex systems of adult services and benefits as well as medical and mental health systems. She is further adept in working individually with students of all abilities to empower self-advocacy and goal achievement.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Building Gratitude in our Kids

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Tabitha Monahan, M.A., CRC
NESCA Transition Specialist/Counselor

Would it be November without a blog post about gratitude? Gratitude feels both more important and harder to come by this year with the slew of events bombarding people’s personal lives and something different appearing what feels like every news cycle. But there must be something to all this gratitude if everyone from Forbes Magazine to Psychology Today is writing about it?

So what does the science say?

Basically, gratitude makes us happier and healthier. Being grateful and expressing gratitude can increase our social circle and have others be more willing to seek you out. Gratitude also seems to improve not only mental health but physical health as well. Studies show that grateful people take care of themselves better. They are more likely to exercise and more likely to follow up with medical personal. Studies show that writing in a gratitude journal before bed can even help you sleep better! (Morin, n.d.)

How can I help my child build gratitude?

Young people with disabilities, especially speech and language challenges, may have a hard time sharing their experiences at the end of the school day. Before my students left for the day, I would always ask them to go around the room and share one thing they enjoyed during their day. This way, no matter how challenging the day was, they ended it on a good note. Over time, the students began to look forward to sharing a positive experience from their day. Whether it was getting a compliment at their worksite or overcoming a challenge, they began to go looking for the positives.

Another wonderful way to build gratitude is to turn it into a scavenger hunt. Give each day a topic and share your gratitude topic at dinner. 

While we often think of a gratitude journal as something written, it doesn’t have to be. Have fun with it! Instead of writing down what you are thankful for today, take a picture with your phone or have your child make a drawing relating to the topic. Pinterest is full of great ideas, like the image below. Doing this for a month may turn you and your child a little more gleeful and find a brighter outlook on tomorrow.

Image Credit: Woman of Purpose (thepurposedwomanmag.com)

What are you grateful for today?

 

About the Author

Tabitha Monahan, M.A., CRC, is an experienced transition evaluator and vocational counselor. While she is well-versed in supporting a wide range of transition-aged youth, she is especially passionate and knowledgeable in helping clients and their families navigate the complex systems of adult services and benefits as well as medical and mental health systems. She is further adept in working individually with students of all abilities to empower self-advocacy and goal achievement.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

What Is A Representative Payee?

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Tabitha Monahan, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist/Counselor

Your child has turned 18. The application for Supplemental Security Insurance (SSI) has been submitted and approved. You’ve been assigned to be the representative payee to manage the SSI funds. How can you still help your child gain money management skills while managing the responsibilities as required by the Social Security Administration (SSA)?

What is a Representative Payee?

Many individuals with disabilities can safely and successfully manage their finances without assistance. However, due to their disability’s nature, many individuals are unable to manage their finances without help. In response to individuals who need assistance to ensure their needs are being met through their benefits, the SSA created representative payees. A representative payee is a person or organization assigned by the SSA to be responsible for the benefits that a person receives from the SSA and ensures that the beneficiary’s needs, such as housing, food and medical care are met. A representative payee can be a family member, friend or another person. When the representative payee is an organization, there is often a fee (determined by the SSA), but when the payee is a friend or family member, the payee provides this service at no cost to the beneficiary. The representative payee will make a budget for the beneficiary to ensure basic needs are met and provide money for savings and personal spending if funds allow.

A representative payee is responsible for tracking and keeping detailed records of how the funds are spent and must provide those records to the SSA when asked. Many payees also need to fill out an annual reporting to the SSA detailing how the funds from the previous year were used. Recent changes in the law amended who needed to fill out such reports. Now, parents and spouses who are representative payees and live with the beneficiary no longer need to fill out the annual report. However, they do still need to keep detailed financial records.

How can I support my child’s financial literacy as their representative payee?

I have been a representative payee for individuals with disabilities for the vast majority of my career. In that role, I also worked to increase the individual’s financial literacy skills and increase their understanding of their financial situation. Having the individual involved in the process has innumerable benefits, the most basic of being the respect for their human rights. By having the individuals involved as much as they are capable and is healthy for them, much of the animosity and much of the paternalism of having another person control their finances, can be dissipated. Some individuals will still choose to have minimal involvement in their finances due to anxiety, comprehension or individual priorities. But most will want a say. By meeting your child where they are in their financial journey, you can build their confidence, independence and autonomy.

The first step I like to take in building an understanding around finances is helping the person comprehend where their money is going. Maybe that will be showing your child a bank statement. Perhaps it will be showing receipts. For many young people, the amount they receive in SSI seems like a lot of money. Helping them understand the value of the funds they receive can be one of the most challenging tasks.

Another activity I like to do with the beneficiaries I assist is asking them to create their budget. How would they like to see their money spent? What are their financial goals? Do they want to live on their own someday? How much do they want to set aside for savings for more significant expenses or purchases, like first, last and security deposit; a car; a vacation? Below is a very basic budgeting form I like to use as a starting point.

Beneficiary Budget Month Year
Income
SSI $783.00
MA State Supplement $114.39
Total Income: $897.39
Expense
Rent $265.00
Groceries $200.00
Transportation $55.00
Electricity $60.00
Cable $105.00
Cell Phone $75.00
Medication $15.00
Personal Spending $75.00
Savings $25.00
Total Spending: $875.00

Within the last few years, ABLE accounts have been getting a lot of press – and for good reason. For individuals who became disabled at birth or at a young age, an ABLE account is a wonderful way for the individual to save money for important needs and not have those assets affect the essential financial and healthcare benefits they need. The IRS recently updated the rules for ABLE accounts. In the resources below is an article from Disability Scoop with information about these updates.

One of the best ways to increase your child’s money management skills is to have them be responsible for portions of their money. They are many ways to do this, and it may take some trial and error to find the best way for your child. It is important to remember that you are not allowed to give the beneficiary direct access to the bank account as the representative payee. That means you cannot just hand over the debit card to your child. However, many companies offer programs that help young people (and adults) manage their money. I tend not to use the word “allowance” for adults when managing their money. Instead, I use words like “personal spending” or “Flex Money.” Whether I write a check to the individual for these funds or reload a prepaid debit card, giving the individuals the remaining money after necessities have been met gives them the freedom to make their own spending choices, whether good or bad. And yes, I have worked with individuals who were without personal spending money within days of receiving their excess funds for the month. Still, I have worked with individuals who have, over time, been able to build some savings and a greater understanding of money management. I have listed some in the resources, but these are not ones I have personally used, so please review and see which ones you think would work best for your family.

Another method that I find beyond useful to help build financial independence and assess current money management skills is to transfer the responsibility of paying a bill over to the individual. This should be a lower priority bill, like the cable bill, a streaming service or a cell phone bill. As time goes on and the person can pay the bill on time without prompts, increase the number of accounts the person is responsible for paying. As they build their financial independence, increase their personal spending to include funds for necessities, such as groceries and prescription copays. And remember, once a person has a representative payee, it does not mean that they must have one for life. Suppose your child is able to build the financial management skills necessary to manage their finances independently. In that case, a representative payee can be removed. If your child now has the skills to manage their own money, talk to one of your child’s providers. They can fill out a form to return this right to your child.

Have you been working with your child on money management skills? How have you fostered financial independence?

 

Resources:

Social Security Administration Representative Payee Webpage

Disability Scoop: IRS Issues Final Rules on ABLE Accounts

The Balance: The Best Debit Cards for Teens

Capital One MONEY Account

Dough Roller: Best Prepaid Debit Cards for Teens

FAQs for Beneficiaries that have Representative Payees

 

About the Author

Tabitha Monahan, M.A., CRC, is an experienced transition evaluator and vocational counselor. While she is well-versed in supporting a wide range of transition-aged youth, she is especially passionate and knowledgeable in helping clients and their families navigate the complex systems of adult services and benefits as well as medical and mental health systems. She is further adept in working individually with students of all abilities to empower self-advocacy and goal achievement.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Voting Support for Individuals with Disabilities

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Tabitha Monahan, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist/Counselor

General Election season is upon us. The major-party national conventions are over, and the Massachusetts primary results are in.

About 20% of eligible voters have a disabilitybut only 49.3% of individuals with disabilities voted in 2018. And that was an 8.5% increase from previous years among this increasingly important voting bloc. Campaigns, such as the REV UP Campaign by the American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD), have launched voter registration drives, championed for disability rights and policies to be part of the political conversation, and to increase awareness and action to remove barriers that make it challenging for individuals with disabilities to vote.

So how can we help our young people with disabilities exercise their right to vote? In Massachusetts, even individuals with guardianship maintain their right to vote unless the court documents specifically state otherwise. There are many ways to support individuals, but it starts with helping them register. Massachusetts residents can register to vote online, when obtaining or renewing a driver’s license or state ID, or at the local registrar of voters’ office. Notices from MassHealth and the DTA also include voter registration forms.

Absentee/mail-in ballots have been in the news more than ever due to the pandemic. Still, they have long been an excellent strategy for individuals with disabilities who would have difficulty voting in person. Absentee ballots are a great option for individuals who may have difficulty navigating the multiple steps in person or have a lower processing speed.

All citizens are also allowed to bring a person to help them while they are at the polls. Encourage your young person that many people require assistance at the polls, and it is completely normal to have the help available if they need it. Each polling location should also have at least one AutoMARK Voter Assist Terminal, which helps individuals with visual impairments vote independently.

No one wants their vote not to be counted due to errors filling out their ballot. People can request a sample ballot in advance from their local registrar of voters (the Secretary of State’s website can give you the address and phone number of your local registrar). Practicing filling out ballots in advance (even ballots from previous elections) can help a new voter become comfortable with the form and is great fine motor skill practice for those who may need it!

The Massachusetts Secretary of State also creates a voter information booklet for each election regarding the ballot initiatives. These red booklets can be found at many community locations and frequently include the local library, post office and city/town hall. These booklets offer information on what a yay or nay vote would mean and have information from each initiative’s proponents and opponents. Use that sample ballot as a starting point for the different types of elected positions.

Help your young adult find out what the different boards do and why there is an election for things such as town selectman or zoning board. Help your young adult find the websites for candidates running for office and review the candidates’ stances on issues. Ask what issues they want to learn more about and are important to them.

Most importantly, remind them that their voice counts. As many disability rights activists have said, “nothing about us without us.” Individuals with disabilities are greatly affected by the policy decisions that occur in government at all levels. Since many individuals with disabilities have frequently experienced disenfranchisement, there are numerous groups working tirelessly to lessen and remove these barriers. How have you helped your young adult exercise their right to vote?

 

About the Author

Tabitha Monahan, M.A., CRC, is an experienced transition evaluator and vocational counselor. While she is well-versed in supporting a wide range of transition-aged youth, she is especially passionate and knowledgeable in helping clients and their families navigate the complex systems of adult services and benefits as well as medical and mental health systems. She is further adept in working individually with students of all abilities to empower self-advocacy and goal achievement.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.