Tag

life skills

Transition Training in Today’s Environment

By | NESCA Notes 2021

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

As we head back to school and continue to live with COVID in our lives, it has become apparent that transition services must include training our students to live in this “new normal.” When I sat down to write about back to school tips and suggestions, I was reminded of the blog post that I wrote last summer in preparation of our return to the classrooms. I never would have thought that we would be returning to masks in the fall of 2021, but here we are! Below are some basic ideas from my blog last summer about how to continue developing transition skills if community-based options are not fully available.

Independent Living
Practice using Peapod or other online grocery delivery services
Cooking within the school building
Research how to order prescriptions online or over the phone
Practice mock phone calls to order food, make a medical appointment, etc.
Review public transportation schedules and research how long it takes to get from one place to another

Vocational
Folding clothes or stocking shelves in the school store
Learning how to use Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.
Practice mock interviews
Use free online resources to watch short career videos and start a binder of likes and dislikes about each job
Identify places you might like to work (MANY places are hiring due to a shortage of workers)

Functional Academics
Access your bank account online and see where you spend your money
Use mock online banking resources to understand the do’s and don’ts
Practice ordering at a restaurant by using an online menu

Helpful Resources

In addition to the above suggestions, there are many other resources that parents, educators, and individuals may find helpful.

“Coping With COVID” Anxiety Worksheets
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Coping-with-Covid-19-Anxiety-19-Worksheets-for-Teens-Google-Slides-option-5763713?st=16ac0d9101b4f377d4a58d35e2284100

Vaccine Lesson
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/COVID-19Coronavirus-mRNA-vaccines-Pfizer-vs-Moderna-6573582?st=16ac0d9101b4f377d4a58d35e2284100

Updated DDS guidance (8/11/21)
https://www.mass.gov/news/coronavirus-update-from-dds-commissioner-jane-ryder

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Vision Statements

By | NESCA Notes 2021

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

Having been a transition specialist, evaluator and consultant, as well as having worked different roles within the special education system for many years, I have come to learn that the “Post-Secondary Vision Statement” for a student is one of the most overlooked pieces of the transition and IEP process. To me, this is one of the MOST important parts of the transition planning process for students, their families, and their Team members. The vision statement is a key part of a student’s IEP, as well as their Transition Planning Form (TPF), once a student turns 14. Prior to a student turning 14, the vision statement should be completed collaboratively by the Team. Once a student turns 14, I encourage the student to have as much input as possible, no matter how realistic or unrealistic the vision is. There have been times when I have seen two vision statements on an IEP, one for the student and one for the parents and/or Team, depending on the situation. Many times, parents or school staff will ask for guidance on what information should be gathered and how to get that information from a student.

Below are some of the tips that I have learned and shared along the way:

  • The vision will most likely change from year to year.
  • The vision is what should be driving the development of the IEP.
  • Starting at age 14, the vision statement that is in the IEP needs to correspond with the vision statement on the TPF.
  • From age 14 on, the vision statement (as well as the TPF) should be read at the beginning of the IEP meeting to make sure the Team is focusing on the areas needed to assist a student in reaching their vision.
  • If a student is unable to write their own vision, it is important that the Team incorporates what they know about the students’ strengths, interests, etc.

A vision statement can be long or short. It is not the length of it that matters, but the content. With the summer now starting, it is a good time to sit down with your student and start to discuss some of the below areas to be prepared for the upcoming school year.

  • Education
    • Do you want to pass MCAS?
    • Do you want to earn a high school diploma?
    • Do you want to stay in school until the age of 22?
    • Do you want to go to a 2- or 4-year college?
    • Do you want to take classes towards a certificate program/trade?
    • Do you want to attend a community-based day program?
  • Employment
    • Do you want to have a part-time job while you are still in school?
    • What do you want to be when you are older (even if it is unrealistic)?
    • Do you want to participate in volunteer work?
    • Do you want to work part-time or full-time?
    • If you are unsure about what job you might like, what tasks/activities do you enjoy doing?
  • Independent Living
    • Do you want to live on your own, in a shared living setting or stay living with family?
    • Would you like to live alone or with a roommate?
    • Do you want to live in the same area?
    • How will you access the community (i.e., public transportation, driver’s license, family, etc.)?
    • Do you want to work on developing your independent living skills, such as money management/budgeting, domestic skills, cooking, shopping, first aid, etc.?
    • What do you want to do for fun (i.e., community events, sports, acting, working out, etc.)?

There are many resources available to families regarding what to do and not to do when it comes to writing a strong vision statement for a student of any age. Below are a few examples of resources that I have found helpful:

https://www.concordspedpac.org/IEPvision.htm

https://datamomkristen.com/developing-a-measurable-vision-statement-for-an-iep-or-isp/

https://adayinourshoes.com/iep-vision-statement/

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Bolstering Transition Skills in Another Summer of COVID-19

By | NESCA Notes 2021

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

With rules and regulations around COVID-19 beginning to change, I took the time to reflect on a blog that I wrote almost exactly one year ago today. That blog focused on how bolster skills during the summer months when COVID-19 restrictions had limited so many of the hands-on, community-based and real-world experiences and opportunities for those of transition age due to social distancing. So many of the typical learning opportunities were just not available at that time.

While many things may have changed since last year, we are still not completely back to our old “normal.” In fact, I have spent the last year working to adapt transition skills and services for the students and clients with whom I work for this “new normal.” Since we will be living in this “new normal” for an uncertain amount of time longer, we’ll need to continue to provide transition support and services to our young adults in this still fairly limited environment.

We are indeed beginning to open back up, but not all of the typical opportunities and experiences in the community will be readily available to participate in. If you are once again looking to bolster transition skills over the summer, the following are examples of resources and activities that could be incorporated into an individual’s summer routine. Updated suggestions for opportunities that may be more available this year are also included.

Career-Research/Vocational Activities:

https://careerkids.com/pages/career-research

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Browse/Search:career%20research/Price-Range/Free

https://www.careeronestop.org/Videos/video-library.aspx

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Vocational-Skills-Ice-Cream-Shop-Worker-Shift-Elapsed-Time-Boom-Cards-6874043?fbclid=IwAR2SP077flhzJq9F5ZEzjNcVqMhGGIqMwPM4h5_bOS65CQlA1XmtJyME48Y

Virtualjobshadow.com

Online Banking:

https://www.moneyinstructor.com/onlinebanking.asp

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Browse/Price-Range/Free/Search:online%20banking

https://www.bankaroo.com/

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Debit-Card-Digital-Interactive-Activities-4459286?fbclid=IwAR0XObQr2srDU8c7OMqj2O_MobluuxFep-BfOEo7jbRj51tvTOpIFHVTn8E

Domestic Skills (i.e., cooking, cleaning, laundry):

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/DLS-Doing-the-Laundry-Workbook-423396

https://tacanow.org/family-resources/developing-lifeskills-chores/

https://accessiblechef.com/

Recreation and Leisure:

http://www.spedchildmass.com/special-needs-recreation-disability-autism-aspergers-massachusetts/

https://www.wtae.com/article/virtual-disney-world-rides/31788233?fbclid=IwAR1-RK5xHwsCMteU7qM8y1oRGisz2Pp1nifGDfY-MaMgYl0Ih6hf9MxKlCM#

www.kahoot.com (several free interactive games that can be played in-person or virtually)

Post-secondary Education:

https://www.youvisit.com/collegesearch/

https://campustours.com/

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Executive Function Tools: Natural Consequences

By | NESCA Notes 2021

By: Sophie Bellenis, OTD, OTR/L
Occupational Therapist; Real-life Skills Program Manager and Coach, NESCA

In my last blog that focused on executive function tools, I delved into the benefits of using and committing to a digital calendar. The calendar is a concrete tool that can be directly taught to students using traditional methods. Less concrete, but in many ways equally useful, is this next executive function tool – the natural consequence.

When most people think of natural consequences, they think of younger children refusing to do things like eat a meal that their caregiver prepared or put on a coat when it is cold outside. If a child refuses their dinner, the natural consequence is hunger. If a child refuses to wear their coat, the natural consequence is feeling cold. These are consequences that will happen without parents or caregivers explicitly providing a consequence. When it comes to executive function mishaps, the natural consequence is often the need to independently deal with the fallout.

Many of the students I serve directly need scaffolded executive function support with direct instruction and specific opportunities for practice. I am not advocating for removing these services or throwing these students to the proverbial wolves. What I am advocating for is using mistakes or lapses in executive function skill as learning opportunities, as opposed to absolving our students from all responsibility and continuously jumping in to save the day. To demonstrate this difference, here are a few examples of ways I have seen parents successfully use natural consequences as a tool to teach executive function.

Case Studies

  1. Amber is a student who has had consistent difficulty organizing her time after school. While she attends many different afterschool activities, such as recycling club and track, she is often late to practice or misses important changes to the schedule. To help Amber, her parents set up a calendar with notifications and reminders that appear on her phone and her computer directly after school. Recently, Amber started driving lessons with the local driving school. A few weeks ago, Amber had a conversation with her mother in the morning about the fact that she would be picked up for a lesson 10 minutes after the end of the school day. Amber’s notification on her phone went off 15 minutes before the lesson, and she received a pop-up on her computer screen 30 minutes before the end of the school day. Despite these reminders, Amber hopped onto the bus at the end of the day. While this was an honest mistake, Amber was not using her tools or the time management strategies that she has been taught and is expected to use. Amber’s parents decided that as a natural consequence, Amber would need to deal with fixing her mistake. They were there to support her as she called the driving school, apologized to the instructor, and rescheduled her appointment. If she was not willing to take these steps, another natural consequence would have been a delay in getting her license. This caused some heightened anxiety for Amber, but with encouragement from her parents, she practiced the phone call out loud and looked through her calendar to see where she had availability for a make-up appointment. Amber’s parents could have easily called the driving school and fixed these problems for her; however, Amber would have missed out on an opportunity to practice problem solving.
  2. Another student who benefited from natural consequences is Albert. Albert’s parents hired a tutor to meet with him over Zoom twice per week to prepare for the SATs. He was expected to meet with his tutor, Barry, two times per week to start building up his skills. Unfortunately, despite frequent reminders and systems being put in place, Albert often missed or was late to these meetings as he was distracted by playing video games. When Albert’s parents started to receive charges for missed appointments from Barry’s company, they thought carefully about how to impress on Albert the importance of using his strategies and making it to his appointments. Eventually, Albert’s parents informed him that if he missed another session, he would be responsible for the late fee, as the charge was an inevitable consequence. When Albert eventually missed another session, his father drove him to the bank and helped him withdraw the money from his own savings account to pay his parents for the missed session. Unsurprisingly, this was hugely frustrating to Albert in the moment; however, his meetings with Barry became a priority and Albert quickly started making it to tutoring on time. After experiencing the natural consequence himself, Albert began to change his actions.

Both of these examples led to increased buy-in from the adolescents who were actively working on building up their executive functioning skills. As they started to participate in problem solving after they made a mistake, they were more aware of the work that their parents had typically been doing for them. Some language that can be productive includes:

  • “I know it was a mistake and now we just need to figure out how to fix it. What do you think we should do?”
  • “What are the next steps you need to take to solve this problem?”
  • “I can tell you what I think we should do, but I would love to hear your ideas first. Where would you start?”

As adolescents forge toward young adulthood, they will inevitably make mistakes, miss appointments, arrive late, and misplace some of their belongings. If we are constantly picking up the pieces, then they are missing out on the opportunity to learn how to solve their own problems and build an understanding of the consequences.

 

About the Author
Sophie Bellenis is a Licensed Occupational Therapist in Massachusetts, specializing in educational OT and functional life skills development. Bellenis joined NESCA in the fall of 2017 to offer community-based skills coaching services as a part of the Real-life Skills Program within NESCA’s Transition Services team. Bellenis graduated from the MGH Institute of Health Professions with a Doctorate in Occupational Therapy, with a focus on pediatrics and international program evaluation. She is a member of the American Occupational Therapy Association, as well as the World Federation of Occupational Therapists. Having spent years delivering direct services at the elementary, middle school and high school levels, Bellenis has extensive background with school-based occupational therapy services.  She believes that individual sensory needs and visual skills must be taken into account to create comprehensive educational programming.

 

To book an appointment or to learn more about NESCA’s Occupational Therapy Services, please fill out our online Intake Form, email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton, Massachusetts, Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

The Roles of Students, the School and the Family during the Transition Planning Process

By | NESCA Notes 2021

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

The transition process is a complex and ongoing one. Throughout the transition planning process, many individuals often wonder who exactly is responsible for what. While the school system plays a big role during this time, it is also important to make sure that students and their families/guardians have a role in the process as well. Here’s a helpful breakdown of the participants involved in the transition process and what responsibilities fall within each of their roles.

The Role of the School in the Transition Process

  • Provide information on the student’s strengths, past achievements and progress on the current IEP
  • Provide strategies for effectively teaching the student, including appropriate accommodations and/or modifications so the student can successfully access the general curriculum
  • Identify needed related services
  • Coordinate all the people, agencies, services or programs involved in the transition planning
  • Link students and parents to appropriate post-school services, supports or agencies prior to the student leaving high school
  • Suggest courses of interest to the student and educational experiences that relate to the student’s preferences and interests and that provide skills to help the student achieve their desired post-school goals
  • Hold workshops for families on transition planning, post-secondary options, adult service providers, etc.

The Role of the Student in the Transition Process

  • Participate actively in all discussions and decisions (IEP meetings). This could include reading their vision statement, creating a PowerPoint to share at the meeting, etc.
  • Communicate preferences and interests
  • Communicate strengths and areas where help is needed
  • Take part in the IEP development
  • Develop a post-secondary vision statement
  • Identify transition-related skills that can be done in the home environment (i.e., chores)

The Role of the Parent(s)/Guardian in the Transition Process

  • Support the student
  • Reinforce the value of an individualized, appropriate educational program
  • Provide information about the student’s strengths, interests and areas where assistance is needed
  • Provide information about the student’s independent living skills and the help the student may need to achieve the desired post-school goals
  • Be actively engaged as equal partners in all aspects of the IEP planning, discussion and decision-making
  • Work in collaboration with the school to practice transition skills within the home environment

Below are some additional resources on this topic:

http://alabamaparentcenter.com/resources/documents/Transition_v2_Whatschoolscandotoinvolvefamilies.pdf
https://fcsn.org/transition_guide/english.pdf
https://www.communityinclusion.org/pdf/man5.pdf

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Executive Function Tools: The Calendar

By | NESCA Notes 2021

By: Sophie Bellenis, OTD, OTR/L
Occupational Therapist; Real-life Skills Program Manager and Coach, NESCA

When working with young adults and adolescents to build up executive function skills, my main goal is to find systems and strategies that are truly helpful, easily accessed and that will eventually be used independently. While there are many fabulous apps that have been developed to target specific organizational skills, such as medication management, creating to-do lists and taking notes, I would argue that the number one, most important tool is an accurate, up-to-date calendar. The format of a digital calendar provides three hugely important supports.

  1. Visual Map of Time – Time management is tricky, and for many of our students, the concept of time itself is quite abstract. A calendar that has chunks of time visually blocked out helps to concretize an abstract concept. Additionally, having a calendar can help students plan their work. If a student has five different assignments to work on in a given week, looking at a calendar to find available segments of time will often help them realize that leaving everything until the last minute will not be possible. Notably, this requires guidance at first. Asking students questions, such as, “how long does an assignment like this generally take you?” or “would that available hour on Tuesday give you enough time for your problem set?” will help them start to internally ask themselves the right questions.
  2. Built-in Notification Systems – Some students use the alarms on their phone as reminders that they need to complete academic or daily living tasks. For example, they may have an alarm at 7:00pm every evening as a prompt to take their medication. Digital calendar apps allow for notifications to be linked to an event or task. Sometimes a simple reminder 10 minutes before a meeting or class is plenty, and our students can arrive on time with that quick prompt. For other appointments, I have students set two separate notifications, one in the morning and one at the time they would need to start getting ready or prepared for an appointment. For example, if a student has a doctor’s appointment two months in the future, a student could benefit from setting a notification eight hours and 1 hour before the appointment. This way, they start their morning with an acute awareness of their responsibility that afternoon and are reminded again when they need to start getting ready to leave.
  3. Constant Access when Synced across Devices – Calendars, such as the Google Calendar, sync seamlessly across digital devices. The same calendar can be accessed from a phone, a tablet, a laptop or a desktop quickly and easily. Students can refer to their phone when they are out and about or their computer if they are focused in class.

Research shows us that building executive function skills requires direct instruction and the opportunity to practice (Semenov & Zelazo, 2019). While using a calendar may seem like a simple skill, many of the systems provided in high schools take away the opportunity for students to practice setting up and maintaining their own calendar. Online portals have calendars that are immediately synced to the teacher’s schedule with assignments and due dates already entered. Additionally, many of our students rely on their parents to keep track of any and all appointments (medical or otherwise), meetings and other scheduled activities. This means that when starting a more independent schedule – whether at a university, vocational program or first job – these students often find themselves overwhelmed by the deadlines and the number of responsibilities that they must track. I urge parents to slowly increase the number of appointment and activities that students are in charge of remembering on their own. Helping a student enter doctor or dentist appointments, vacation details, such as flight or bus times, and deadlines into their personal calendar helps them start to build this habit and provides opportunity for practice. We have the tools to help students make this transition more easily, and with small, intentional changes to expectations of responsibility and independence, we can provide students with tools in their back pockets so they are ready to support (and schedule) themselves!

References

Semenov A, D, Zelazo P, D: Mindful Family Routines and the Cultivation of Executive Function Skills in Childhood. Human Development 2019;63:112-131. doi: 10.1159/000503822

 

About the Author

Sophie Bellenis is a Licensed Occupational Therapist in Massachusetts, specializing in educational OT and functional life skills development. Bellenis joined NESCA in the fall of 2017 to offer community-based skills coaching services as a part of the Real-life Skills Program within NESCA’s Transition Services team. Bellenis graduated from the MGH Institute of Health Professions with a Doctorate in Occupational Therapy, with a focus on pediatrics and international program evaluation. She is a member of the American Occupational Therapy Association, as well as the World Federation of Occupational Therapists. Having spent years delivering direct services at the elementary, middle school and high school levels, Bellenis has extensive background with school-based occupational therapy services.  She believes that individual sensory needs and visual skills must be taken into account to create comprehensive educational programming.

 

To book an appointment or to learn more about NESCA’s Occupational Therapy Services, please fill out our online Intake Form, email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton, Massachusetts, Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Generalizing Skills from the Classroom to Home and Community – Part 2

By | NESCA Notes 2021

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

Back in my December blog, I delved into the question, “How do I get my students to transfer the skills they are learning in school to the home environment?”.  As I mentioned then – and which is still true now – this is a question that almost every parent thinks and asks about. It still remains that every student and home environment are different, so the first step is to individualize the process and see what works best for both the student and the family in an attempt to generalize those life skills.

In my last blog, I provided suggested activities and resources that focused on the areas of cooking and domestic skills. In this blog, I will share information regarding the areas of financial literacy and community resources. Please note that these are a wide range of activities, and it is important to determine what is most appropriate for your young adult.

Financial Literacy

  • Coin and bill identification with real money. It is important to practice identifying the values of coins and bills with real currency.
  • Set up a store in your home and label items with realistic prices. This can be good practice for identifying how much items cost, budgeting, rounding up to the next dollar, checking for correct change, etc.
  • When you feel they are ready, assist your young adult in opening up their own bank account. Be sure to take them with you and make sure they understand the process and the responsibility that is associated with this (i.e., financial safety).
  • If your young adult has a bank account, you could assign them one household bill to pay per month. This will help them begin to understand of the cost of living, as well as responsibility.
  • If safety is a concern, many parents choose to start their young adults off with the use of gift cards versus a debit/credit card. This could be a grocery store gift card so your young adult can independently shop for their list of items and check out independently.
  • I have had many families look into safer debit card options, such as these (please note that I am not endorsing/NESCA does not endorse any one in particular.
  • Have your young adult perform basic chores within the home and provide them with compensation. This will help build an understanding of working to earn money.
  • Other helpful resources:

Recreation and Leisure

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Generalizing Skills from the Classroom to Home and Community – Part 1

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

“How do I get my student to transfer the skills they are learning in school to the home environment?” This is a question that almost every parent thinks about and asks for suggestions on. I wish I had a simple answer and something that could solve this for each and every student that I have worked with over the years. As you know, every student and home environment are different, so the first step is to individualize the process and see what works best for both the student and the family. Below are some suggestions for two transition areas that have worked, including some resources.

Domestic Skills

Cooking

  • If your student uses a visual recipe in the classroom to learn how to cook, ask the teacher for copies of the exact recipe after it has been mastered in the classroom.
  • Try to have similar cooking tools in the home kitchen that your student uses at school.
  • Start with something basic and that your student likes. It is more of an incentive if they will enjoy eating the end product!
  • Some families choose one night a week that their student cooks with the family or by themselves. This will help build a routine, as well as having your student contribute as an active member of the household.
  • Another motivator for some students is to have a family member take a short video or photo of them cooking (or the final product) so it can be shared with their teacher or other family members. I can’t tell you how much of a confidence booster this has been for students who I have worked with!
  • Other helpful resources:

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

A Week in the Life of a Transition Teacher During COVID-19

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

PPE, 6 feet apart, no sharing of materials, remote learning, handwashing, social distancing, hybrid learning…. These are just a few of the thoughts that went through every educator’s mind prior to the start of the 2020 school year. Making a personal decision to go back to teaching in the midst of a pandemic was a no brainer for me. I love teaching, I love helping students and I love working in the field of special education and transition. Once the reality hit that August was just around the corner, I realized that I needed to be even more creative than ever before in providing transition services to my students and their families. COVID-19 was not going to stop students from getting closer to aging out of the special education system and needing to be as prepared as everyone else before they move into the adult world. I began reading blogs, joining Facebook groups, searching for resources and talking with current and former colleagues. As I was doing all of this, I realized that there was no guide for how special educators were supposed to prepare for the upcoming year. It was up to every educator, including myself, to think outside the box and determine what we were all going to do to continue to provide the services that our students have always needed.

When I found out that I would be teaching in-person four days a week and remote once a week, I was relieved, yet nervous at the same time. The students many of us work with need to be taught in-person to best access the curriculum and learn new skills. They require hands-on learning opportunities, community-based instruction and face-to-face interaction. Many people asked how I was going to do this with all of the safety restrictions and regulations. I always found myself saying the same thing, “I will do it how I always have.” Seems easy enough, right?

I went into week one feeling excited to get back to some sense of “normal” and confident with my preparation of schedules, functional academic activities, lesson plans and all of the COVID-19 safety precautions in place. It hasn’t been perfect, and there are many things that we can’t do that we used to be able to, but we are making it work! My students have shown more resilience and adaptability than I ever could have expected. I swear that sometimes they are more resilient than we are as teachers! My goal is to provide some of the ways that we have made this work so others can see that it is doable – and while overwhelming at times – we are indeed all in this together!

The following are suggestions that I have found to be successful:

  • Grocery Shopping: Take a smaller group out and prepare by reviewing COVID-19 safety within the community. There are many free resources out there to help explain how and why we need to wear masks, social distance, follow the arrows in the store aisles, etc.
  • Cooking: Every student has their own “cooking bucket” that allows for safety to be the top priority. This can include individual measuring cups, a cutting board, spatula, mixing bowl, oven mitts, baking sheet, etc. The dollar store is a great option for these items!
  • Social Skills: We are learning new ways of greeting others and having conversations. The days of fist bumps, handshakes and high-fives are now replaced with “air high-fives,” waves and elbow bumps. Everyone is learning that they have to speak louder and clearer to be heard through masks. It takes practice, but over time it will work!
  • College Exploration: Many colleges are offering virtual tours!
  • Career Exploration: If you are not able to get out and participate in informational interviews or job shadowing, there are virtual ways of exploring different jobs and work environments, such as: https://www.careeronestop.org/Videos/CareerVideos/career-videos.aspx or https://www.candidcareer.com/.
  • Community Access: It is Fall in New England and a great time to explore your community! If you are not within walking distance to places, you could possibly try public transportation (with COVID-19 precautions and parent approval) or have a school bus (if available) drive you to local town centers. Spend time having students use Google Maps prior to going and map out where you will visit, what local businesses do and how they can be used, etc. There are still options for outdoor dining, Dunkin’® trips, bringing a bagged lunch to an area with distanced picnic tables, etc.
  • Let’s not forget about the new skills that all of us are learning! There are many opportunities to teach students about resources and options during our “new normal,” including:
    • Zoom, Google Meet, FaceTime
    • Virtual recreation and leisure activities
    • Ordering food from delivery services that offer contactless delivery, such as DoorDash® or Grubhub
    • Using grocery delivery services
    • Online banking
    • Virtual scavenger hunts

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Bolstering Skills This Summer

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

With the status of ESY (Extended School Year) services still yet to be determined for the upcoming summer, many parents of transition-aged individuals (14 and up) are wondering what life skills can be worked on this summer, especially if virtual learning continues.

When we think of developing transition skills, the first words that tend to come to mind are “hands-on,” “community-based,” “real-world experiences,” etc. Unfortunately, in our current state of social distancing, many of the “normal” learning opportunities are not available at this time. While some business are beginning to open back up, and there is optimism that more businesses will be opening come June—depending on what the safety guidelines are—there still may not be opportunities for needed community-based experiences. While many schools are providing creative and individualized transition services through online platforms and remote learning, many students have greater difficulty accessing instruction that is hands-off. If you are looking to bolster transition skills over the summer, the following are examples and resources of transition-related activities that could be incorporated into an individual’s summer routine.

 

Career-Research Activities:

https://careerkids.com/pages/career-research

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Browse/Search:career%20research/Price-Range/Free

https://www.careeronestop.org/Videos/video-library.aspx

 

Online Banking:

https://www.moneyinstructor.com/onlinebanking.asp

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Browse/Price-Range/Free/Search:online%20banking

https://www.bankaroo.com/

 

Domestic Skills (i.e. cooking, cleaning, laundry):

https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/DLS-Doing-the-Laundry-Workbook-423396

https://tacanow.org/family-resources/developing-lifeskills-chores/

https://accessiblechef.com/

 

Recreation and Leisure:

http://www.spedchildmass.com/special-needs-recreation-disability-autism-aspergers-massachusetts/

https://www.wtae.com/article/virtual-disney-world-rides/31788233?fbclid=IwAR1-RK5xHwsCMteU7qM8y1oRGisz2Pp1nifGDfY-MaMgYl0Ih6hf9MxKlCM#

https://www.specialolympics.org/

 

Post-secondary Education:

https://www.youvisit.com/collegesearch/

https://campustours.com/

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.