Tag

Independent Living

What Will Transition Services Look Like in the Fall?

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

Many parents, educators and students are wondering what school will look like in the fall. This is especially important for those students who are receiving community-based transition services. The Massachusetts Department of Elementary & Secondary Education’s (DESE) Senior Associate Commissioner and State Director of Special Education Russell Johnston released a document on July 9th, that provides information regarding the “Guidance on Fall 2020 Special Education Services.” As many of you have heard, there are several options for models for schooling this fall, which include full-time, in-person learning, remote learning and a hybrid model that includes both. The following statement regarding Transition Services was included in this newly released document:

“Although in-person participation in community-based programs and inclusive concurrent enrollment programs at institutions of higher education may be limited at this time, schools and districts should make best efforts to develop plans collaboratively with community-based providers, colleges, parents/guardians, and students in order for students to access as much transition programming as possible. Current health and safety requirements must remain a priority when making decisions as to the extent that transition services are able to be accessed in community-based settings; however, it is highly recommended that in-person transition services resume as soon as it is safe to do so with the proper health and safety measures in place.”

As you can see, it is recommended that in-person transition services begin as soon as it is considered safe to do so. Many educators, families and students rely on schedules to be drafted and/or completed prior to the start of a new school year. In our COVID world that we are currently living in, this is a much harder task to accomplish with there being so many unknowns.

Thinking outside the box when it comes to delivering transition services has always been important. Now, it feels like this needs to be the top priority when planning. Below are some basic ideas around how to continue developing transition skills if community-based options are not available.

Independent Living:

  • Practice using Peapod or other online grocery delivery services
  • Cooking within the school building
  • Research how to order prescriptions online or over the phone
  • Practice mock phone calls to order food, make a medical appointment, etc.
  • Review public transportation schedules and research how long it takes to get from one place to another

Vocational:

  • Folding clothes or stocking shelves in the school store
  • Learn how to use Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, etc.
  • Practice mock interviews
  • Use free online resources to watch short career videos and start a binder of what you like and don’t like about each job
  • Identify places you might like to work once they are hiring again

Functional Academics:

  • Access your bank account online and see where you spend your money
  • Use mock online banking resources to understand the do’s and don’ts
  • Practice ordering at a restaurant by using an online menu

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Helpful Tips for Selecting a Transition Program

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

As a young adult nears the end of their high school career, many parents begin to question whether or not their child is prepared to make the transition to college or career. In Massachusetts, transition planning begins at the age of 14 in order to best prepare individuals for their future. There are cases, however that some students require an extra year of special education services or will access those services until the age of 22. When a transition program is proposed, parents and caregivers tend to have many questions as to what components they should be looking for and what questions should be asked of the proposed programs.

The following areas are identified by the Massachusetts Student-Driven Secondary Transition Model:

  • Education and Training
  • Competitive Employment
  • Independent Living
  • Community Participation

It is important to note that not every student will require training and instruction in each area. This is where a comprehensive transition assessment can be helpful to determine priority areas. Transition services should be individualized, just as each IEP is individualized throughout a student’s school career.

Transition can be an overwhelming and unfamiliar area for many students and families. While researching transition programs to determine the right one for your teen, the following questions can be helpful in gathering the most information:

  • What does a sample schedule look like? It is important to be sure that every student does not have the same schedule, as the services should be tailored to the individual’s needs.
  • How many hours are spent on instruction in the classroom?
  • How many hours are spent on instruction in the community?
  • What transition curriculum do you use? It is important to note that with transition curriculum, many programs do have to adapt due to student profile. Having an outline of the curriculum areas can be helpful, then ask for examples of how topics are adapted for individuals. For example, when thinking about financial literacy, some students may be working on identifying coins, while others are working on online banking or filing taxes.
  • What does the staffing look like? Many students who are used to small student/teacher ratios or 1:1 assistance will need to start thinking about how that will transition to the adult world.
  • Do you offer MCAS tutoring and test taking? Some students enter a transition program while still needing to complete an MCAS and/or high school credits. This can be done within a transition program environment.
  • What related service providers are part of the program? As students get older, services such as occupational therapy (OT) and physical therapy (PT) begin to fade. Many times, this is due to the reality of the adult world. It is important to make sure that a student is receiving these services, if needed, in a community setting. Counseling services are also an important area to ask about. Many students who have attended a therapeutic high school program are used to having access to a clinician throughout their day. When you think about the adult world, you most likely would see your counselor once a week or every other week, so it is important to work on a plan to develop coping strategies for when that support begins to fade.
  • What does their remote learning plan look like? In the times of COVID, it is important to ask for a copy of what a program’s remote learning plan looked like. Even if the plan is to return to school in the fall, it’s helpful to know how a program would continue to provide services during these unprecedented times.
  • Do you offer community college supports? If your student is interested in trying a college class, is this something that the program allows? If they do, what does the support look like? Do they assist in accessing disability services, tutoring, etc.?
  • What do the vocational services look like? It is unrealistic to expect that a program can guarantee a paid job, however asking questions related to what their internships look like, what job coaching support they offer, etc., can be helpful.
  • If you are attending a program that is not in your local community, will the program and staff tailor some travel training and/or community-based opportunities to your home town?

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Preparing for the Transition from Special Education to Adult Services

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

As many parents, educators and young adults know, the transition from special education services to adult services is an overwhelming and scary time. I recently gave a presentation about breaking down the referral process for adult services, as well as highlighting many types of services that are available once a student turns 22 or graduates from high school. From community-based day supports, to job coaching, accessing travel options and managing the day-to-day tasks of living as independently as possible, there are a handful of resources available within Massachusetts. Below you will find some helpful links to begin educating yourself on what some of those services could look like, answers to commonly asked questions, as well as a breakdown of helpful timelines for when the planning process should begin.

Commonly Asked Questions:

  • What are the adult agencies?
    • Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC); Massachusetts Department of Developmental Services (DDS); Massachusetts Department of Mental Health (DMH); Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB); and Massachusetts Commission for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing (MCDHH)
  • What is a 688 referral?
    • A 688 referral can only be completed by school systems for students who may be eligible for adult services. This should be discussed at a student’s IEP meeting AT LEAST two years before the student is expected to graduate or turn 22. It should also be documented in the student’s IEP that it was discussed at the meeting.
    • It is important that the 688 referral is done at least two years before the student is supposed to leave the school system, as this provides enough planning time to determine eligibility for adult services and for the student to be included in the anticipated cost of services for the state.
    • The 688 referral must be signed by the parent or legal guardian, unless the student is over 18 and their own guardian. In this case, the student needs to sign it. There are different agencies (DDS, DMH, MRC, MCB, etc.), and the appropriate one will be discussed and then determined.
  • How do I fill out a self-referral?
    • For the Department of Developmental Services (DDS)
    • For the Department of Mental Health (DMH)
    • For Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission (MRC): Students, family members and/or school staff can begin the referral process with a phone call or a visit to the local MRC Area Office. There may also be a Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor assigned to the student’s high school who can assist with the direct referral process. The MRC direct referral process can begin as early as age 14 or at least two years prior to graduation from high school.

Helpful Links:

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Life Skills for College to Work on Now – Part 2

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Kelley Challen, Ed.M., CAS
Director of Transition Services; Transition Specialist

In Massachusetts, we are more than five weeks into home-based learning and looking toward another two months (or more) of schools and childcare facilities being closed. Unfortunately, this is taking a particularly large social and emotional toll on our teenagers and young adults. One strategy for coping with current conditions is to focus on concrete ways that we can control our daily lives and to set short-term tangible goals. With that in mind, I am writing a second blog focusing on the opportunity teenagers are being given to build daily living and executive functioning skills that will ultimately help them live away from home and self-direct their lives. Last week, I discussed four important skills that are critical for attending residential colleges: getting up on time each morning, doing laundry, having basic kitchen skills, and using basic tools for assembling and fixing things around home. This week, I am offering another four skills. For any young person, I always suggest letting the student pick the skill(s) they want to work on first. When you have a lot to work on, you may as well pick the starting point that feels most important and motivating!

  • Medications: For students who have been on medication during high school, keeping that medication regimen stable is typically a must during the transition to college. Students need to have the knowledge, preparation and organizational skills needed to maintain their own medication regimen. Often a good way to start this process is to purchase a 7-day pill organizer and have teens be responsible for dispensing their own medication for the week. Certainly, a smartphone or smartwatch with several alarms can be useful for remembering medications at needed times. For more information about medication management expectations in college, check out this article by Rae Jacobson. He makes some useful recommendations, such as using a unique alarm tone for medication reminders and putting pills in highly or frequently visible locations (e.g., next to your toothbrush that you routinely use).
  • Money: Students in early stages of high school may be too young for their own bank accounts and credit cards. However, some banks do offer accounts that are specially tailored for minors. Students can open a joint bank account as a minor with a parent or legal guardian. Teens can also practice managing plastic through use of traditional prepaid debit cards, Amazon.com or store gift cards, or a debit card made especially for minors like Greenlight. From home, teens can practice making necessary online purchases, tracking payments and shipping, checking account balances, and using a software like Microsoft Excel or Google Sheets to keep a record of purchases. There are also plenty of great free web-based financial literacy resources that teens can use to learn about banking and consumer skills from home; a few resources that my colleague Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, and I like include:
  • Building an Exercise Routine: Believe it or not, basic fundamentals like healthy eating, sleep hygiene and regular vigorous exercise are strong predictors of college success and satisfaction. As we are living in a period of time where team sports are not accessible, this may be exactly the right time for teenagers to build their own individual exercise routine that can be carried out at home and in one’s local neighborhood. A good baseline to strive for is a routine that includes exercise sessions at least three days per week. With decreased time factors in our lives, students can play around with morning, afternoon or evening exercise to see what feels best for their bodies and brains. If brisk dog-walking, jogging/running or biking activities are not appealing, there are plenty of great YouTube exercise videos (e.g., dance, yoga, strength training, cardio training, etc.) that require no equipment and are calibrated for all kinds of bodies and levels of fitness. Setting a schedule for weekly workouts will help to ensure that exercise becomes more routine and tracking progress with that schedule (e.g., journaling, marking a calendar, using an app like Strava or Aaptiv, etc.) helps to build and sustain motivation. Some teens (and adults) also find that they are more able to stick to an exercise routine if they use a smartwatch to help track, celebrate and prompt their progress.
  • Using a Calendar System for Scheduling: The alarm clock mentioned in last week’s blog is certainly an important time management tool that is vital to master prior to attending college. Another critical time management tool for college (and life beyond) is a calendar system for managing one’s schedule. When starting to build time management skills, simply asking your teen to write down their schedule can be a good place to start. What do they know they have to do each day of the week? What appointments or activities are missing? Teens may have a calendar system that they are already accustomed to using for checking the date, but may not be using that tool to manage their entire schedule. Some common calendar app tools include iCal, Google Calendar and Outlook, but some teens may do better with paper-based systems. If a teen benefits from a paper copy of their schedule, I would still recommend that they learn to use something electronic, then just print off their daily, weekly or monthly schedule based on preference and need. Practice inputting activities that are happening right now, such as assignments, remote classes, meals, therapy, etc. Teens can also play around with reminder settings to see what feels best for prompting participation in activities. Sometimes 15 minutes is too much time, but 5 or 10 is just right. Other times, more than one reminder is needed.

To read more about the Life Skills recommendations from last week’s Transition Thursday blog, click here!

 

If you are interested in working with a transition specialist at NESCA for consultation, coaching, planning or evaluation, please complete our online intake form: https://nesca-newton.com/intake-form/.

 

About the Author:

Kelley Challen, Ed.M., CAS, is NESCA’s Director of Transition Services, overseeing planning, consultation, evaluation, coaching, case management, training and program development services. She is also the Assistant Director of NESCA, working under Dr. Ann Helmus to support day-to-day operations of the practice. Ms. Challen began facilitating programs for children and adolescents with special needs in 2004. After receiving her Master’s Degree and Certificate of Advanced Study in Risk and Prevention Counseling from Harvard Graduate School of Education, Ms. Challen spent several years at the MGH Aspire Program where she founded an array of social, life and career skill development programs for teens and young adults with Asperger’s Syndrome and related profiles. She additionally worked at the Northeast Arc as Program Director for the Spotlight Program, a drama-based social pragmatics program, serving youth with a wide range of diagnoses and collaborating with several school districts to design in-house social skills and transition programs. Ms. Challen is co-author of the chapter “Technologies to Support Interventions for Social- Emotional Intelligence, Self-Awareness, Personality Style, and Self-Regulation” for the book Technology Tools for Students with Autism. She is also a proud mother of two energetic boys, ages six and three. While Ms. Challen has special expertise in supporting students with Autism Spectrum Disorders, she provides support to individuals with a wide range of developmental and learning abilities, including students with complex medical needs.

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton, Massachusetts, Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

Life Skills for College to Work on Now – Part 1

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Kelley Challen, Ed.M., CAS
Director of Transition Services; Transition Specialist

As a transition specialist working with students who have the cognitive and academic potential for college but have sometimes missed opportunities to develop life skills while keeping up with rigorous academic and extracurricular schedules, I am encouraging families to think of this time as a gift. Students, especially those in 8th-10th grade, have a novel opportunity to build life skills that can help them to live away from home and self-direct their schedules. Without school closures, this opportunity likely would not have come until after 12th grade. With that in mind, here is a list of 4 life skills that are critical for attending residential college that I am recommending some of my students work on:

  • Getting up “on time” each morning: We all know that teenage sleep schedules are rarely in alignment with traditional high school hours. Without transportation time, there is a new opportunity to practice using an alarm clock and build a sleep schedule and that is a little closer to teenage physiological needs. If teens are using a cell phone alarm, it is helpful to put the phone in airplane mode and plug it in away from the bed. With an alarm clock, some experts recommend clocks with blue numbers and facing the clock away from the bed. Good sleep hygiene depends on many factors, such as diet, caffeine intake, exercise, temperature, clothing and electronics use, so teens may want to organize their own “sleep study” to figure out what helps them personally to build a successful sleep routine. Teens can also play around with the sound an app or alarm clock makes to find something that is effective in waking them up without startling.
  • Laundry: When building new skills, I always recommend that students learn and practice the skills to the point of automaticity. Given the amount of time that we are now spending at home, this is the perfect opportunity to learn to do laundry, including reading labels, sorting clothing/linens and running the washer and dryer. If a teen is not interested in learning from a parent, YouTube is a great resource for learning steps to manage laundry and how to operate practically any model of washer or dryer. Teens will learn more quickly if they are practicing the skills multiple times per week, so consider building a schedule that takes into account repeated practice (e.g., clothing is washed midweek, and sheets and towels are washed on the weekend).
  • Basic kitchen skills: While colleges do have meal plans available, many students will still choose to cook a least one meal a day or week for themselves. Being able to cook some basic breakfast, lunch and dinner foods allows students to save money and time, be creative or enjoy a preferred taste/food that they are missing. If a student enjoys cooking and wants to learn to cook for others, that is a great social skill—food is definitely a way to build community (I still have college friends who request I make them grilled cheeses when we get together). I recently came across this parenting piece in The Washington Post highlighting 7 kitchen skills kids need before they leave for college, and now is certainly a good time to work on some of these skills. The article highlights wielding a knife, boiling water, sautéing, baking and roasting, using a slow cooker, planning meals and doing the dishes. But you may want to just start with planning and prepping preferred cold foods or microwave safety. Teens should consider their favorite basic foods and go from there.
  • Using basic tools: You don’t need to know every household maintenance skill to live in a college dorm. But being able to assemble things, fix loose screws and make other basic repairs is important for setting up your dorm or apartment space and saving time (and energy) chasing down maintenance. Some of the basic tools that are useful to be familiar with include a hammer, screwdrivers, measuring tape, pliers, a level, Allen keys and even some wrenches. There are lots of ways to start building familiarity with tools, such as inventorying current household tools, tightening screws on cabinet and drawer handles, hammering down loose nails on a porch, etc. As home repairs need to be tackled, use this as a life skills lesson and include teens in the process. One additional maintenance task that does not require tools is replacing lightbulbs—students should know how to safely remove bulbs from floor and table lamps and check the size, shape and wattage of the bulb, and shop for replacement bulbs.

Stay tuned for additional Life Skills recommendations in next week’s Transition Thursday blog!

 

If you are interested in working with a transition specialist at NESCA for consultation, coaching, planning or evaluation, please complete our online intake form: https://nesca-newton.com/intake-form/.

 

About the Author:

Kelley Challen, Ed.M., CAS, is NESCA’s Director of Transition Services, overseeing planning, consultation, evaluation, coaching, case management, training and program development services. She is also the Assistant Director of NESCA, working under Dr. Ann Helmus to support day-to-day operations of the practice. Ms. Challen began facilitating programs for children and adolescents with special needs in 2004. After receiving her Master’s Degree and Certificate of Advanced Study in Risk and Prevention Counseling from Harvard Graduate School of Education, Ms. Challen spent several years at the MGH Aspire Program where she founded an array of social, life and career skill development programs for teens and young adults with Asperger’s Syndrome and related profiles. She additionally worked at the Northeast Arc as Program Director for the Spotlight Program, a drama-based social pragmatics program, serving youth with a wide range of diagnoses and collaborating with several school districts to design in-house social skills and transition programs. Ms. Challen is co-author of the chapter “Technologies to Support Interventions for Social- Emotional Intelligence, Self-Awareness, Personality Style, and Self-Regulation” for the book Technology Tools for Students with Autism. She is also a proud mother of two energetic boys, ages six and three. While Ms. Challen has special expertise in supporting students with Autism Spectrum Disorders, she provides support to individuals with a wide range of developmental and learning abilities, including students with complex medical needs.

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton, Massachusetts, Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

Tips for Structuring Schedules with Transition Activities

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

There are lots of helpful resources, including articles, blogs, charts, etc. being shared about how to structure your time while you are at home and continue to work on maintaining transition skills. While much of the information is helpful and informative, it can also become overwhelming. Many people have asked how to organize all of the information and make it manageable for both themselves and the transition-aged individual they are supporting.

Below are some samples of schedules and lists that may be helpful establishing routine into this uncertain time.

 

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Maintaining Transition Skills at Home

By | NESCA Notes 2020

By: Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC
Transition Specialist and Consultant

Transition skills are vital for many students, especially those who are close to turning 22 and aging out of the public education system or in their senior year of high school. Below are some free tools and suggestions, based on DESE’s secondary-transition model, regarding how students can continue to work on developing and maintaining a variety of skills while out of school.

Education and Training

  • If you are thinking about taking a college class, spend time researching different colleges online. Make a list of what you like about each school and what you don’t like. Write down what services/accommodations each college has to offer.  
  • Watch virtual tours of college campuses.
  • If you are thinking about going into a training program, research what programs are out there. Are the programs online or in-person and how long do they take to complete, what is the cost, etc.?
  • If you want to finish your MCAS or work on your GED, download study guides online and take practice tests.

Employment

  • Create a free account with teacherspayteachers.com and download free practice job applications and job interview questions.
  • Complete a free online career interest inventory at: www.mynextmove.org and www.careeronestop.org.
  • Research different careers and make a job journal. The job journal can include the following: education needed, work environment (i.e. inside or outside, many people or few people, standing all day or sitting all day, salary, job tasks, etc.). O*Net is a great resource for this.
  • If you have been considering a part time job this summer, start researching places that are easy for you to get to. You can even fill out online applications.
  • Research places in your community that need volunteers. Email them or make a list of whom to contact.

Independent Living

  • Create a free account with teacherspayteachers.com and download free financial literacy activities around banking and budgeting.
  • If you are thinking of getting your Driver’s License, many websites offer free practice online tests.
  • Use Pinterest for recipe ideas and make a meal each day for you or your family.
  • Create a recipe book of foods you can make.
  • Practice different independent living skills for household management (i.e. laundry, cleaning, organizing, folding clothes, sorting clothes by size and color, etc.).
  • If you are thinking about making some extra money when the weather gets nicer, go through items and start making a yard sale pile!

Community Participation

  • Research what adult service agencies have to offer (i.e. MRC, DDS, DMH, Centers for Independent Living, etc.).
  • Register to vote.
  • Research fun places close to where you live and make a list of things you want to do when the weather is nice.

 

About the Author

Becki Lauzon, M.A., CRC, works with teens, young adults and their families out of the Newton, MA and Plainville, MA offices. Lauzon has unparalleled experience as a Transition Specialist, Transition Consultant and Vocational Program Coordinator. Lauzon will be providing transition assessment (including testing, functional evaluations and observations) consultation, case management, training and professional development for schools; and transition planning, consultation and coaching for transition-aged students and their parents.

 

To schedule an appointment with one of NESCA’s expert transition specialists or neuropsychologists, please complete our online intake form

 

Neuropsychology & Education Services for Children & Adolescents (NESCA) is a pediatric neuropsychology practice and integrative treatment center with offices in Newton and Plainville, Massachusetts, and Londonderry, New Hampshire, serving clients from preschool through young adulthood and their families. For more information, please email info@nesca-newton.com or call 617-658-9800.

 

Transition Planning: The Missing Link Between Special Education and Successful Adulthood

By | NESCA Notes 2018
What is Transition Planning and Why Does it Matter?

By: Kelley Challen, Ed.M., CAS
Director of Transition Services
Transition Specialist

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004) is the law that guarantees students with disabilities an equal opportunity for a free and appropriate public education (FAPE). For professionals and parents supporting youth with special needs, and for the children we love, this is a powerful law. IDEA 2004 guarantees that no matter what a young person’s struggles, they have the right to learn and grow and be provided with the specialized instruction necessary for their individual progress.

While many people are aware that IDEA 2004 guarantees the right to special education for academic learning, the concept of “transition services” is still catching on. In addition to requiring that public schools educate our students, IDEA 2004 mandates that special education services are designed to meet a student’s unique needs and to prepare them for further education, employment and independent living. According to this influential federal law, it is not enough that students be included in learning core academics (reading, writing, math, science, history). Rather, we are mandated to ensure that students with disabilities make progress toward being able to manage learning, working, and daily living activities in their postsecondary adult lives.

In December, I was excited to see the Huffington Post (see link below) publish an article emphasizing the importance of transition services and the challenges for students both during and after public education if this part of special education is ‘forgotten.’ The article was written by Sarah Butrymowicz and Jackie Mader and published in partnership with The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focusing on inequality and innovation in education. The authors profiled two young people who participated in public special education: Kate and Peter.

Kate’s educational program did not include meaningful transition services (e.g., career planning, homework activities) and was primarily driven by parent goals rather than person-centered activities. The initial outcome for Kate after special education was unemployment; after two years, her parents secured work for her using their own personal networks but not in an area of true interest or strength. Kate’s father summarized, “It was my absolute goal to have her not fall off the map. It’s unfortunate, she kind of has.”

Peter, however, was an active participant in his Individualized Education Program (IEP) process. While career testing indicated possible aptitude in food services, Peter wanted to be a Supreme Court justice and his team supported his enrollment in community college courses utilizing his school’s dual-enrollment program. With this experiential learning activity, Peter realized he was not interested in college and changed his goal, enrolling instead in vocational technical classes related to office administration. When Peter finished high school, he immediately went to work in an office and continued to full time employment as an administrative assistant at a nonprofit organization.

For so many students with disabilities, experiential learning is a critical component of their development of career, classroom, community living, and home living skills. This is best achieved when students have a collaborative IEP team and good transition services. Butrymowicz and Mader interviewed 100 parents, students, advocates and experts across the country and found that the best transition planning requires several things:

  1. An accurate and thoughtful assessment of a student’s abilities and interests
  2. Clear, measurable goals related to his or her postsecondary aspirations
  3. Appropriate support and services to help them achieve their goals

NESCA has provided person-centered transition services since 2009 and this article beautifully captured what we see every day in our work. What I love about being a transition specialist is helping young people to find their voices, to figure out what they love most, and to create small successes that can ultimately build into a meaningful postsecondary adult life. While many parents and educators I work with can find team meetings challenging or stressful, this is often my favorite part of the job — working collaboratively with the student, parents, educators, and community members to think creatively and build a unique strength-based transition plan.


Article:

Butrymowicz, S., and Mader, J. (2017). This ‘Forgotten’ Part of Special Education Could Lead To Better Outcomes For Students: Many former special education students struggle to find good-paying jobs, and high schools are partly to blame. The Huffington Post. Retrieved from https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/special-education-transition_us_5a341a65e4b0ff955ad2b810 

About the Author:
 
Kelley Challen, EdM, CAS, is NESCA’s Director of Transition Services, overseeing planning, consultation, evaluation, coaching, case management, training and program development services. She began facilitating programs for children and adolescents with special needs in 2004. After receiving her Master’s Degree and Certificate of Advanced Study in Risk and Prevention Counseling from Harvard Graduate School of Education, Ms. Challen spent several years at the MGH Aspire Program where she founded an array of social, life and career skill development programs for teens and young adults with Asperger’s Syndrome and related profiles.  She also worked at the Northeast Arc as Program Director for the Spotlight Program, a drama-based social pragmatics program, serving youth with a wide range of diagnoses and collaborating with several school districts to design in-house social skills and transition programs. While Ms. Challen has special expertise supporting students with Autism Spectrum Disorders, she provides support to individuals with a wide range of developmental and learning abilities including students with complex medical needs. She is also co-author of the chapter “Technologies to Support Interventions for Social- Emotional Intelligence, Self-Awareness, Personality Style, and Self-Regulation” for the book Technology Tools for Students with Autism.